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Bogus Beauty Treatments

Beauty queen and former Elvis love Priscilla Presley, now 62, famously made headlines when she visited a doctor who injected her with “low-grade silicon” he had smuggled into the US. It is thought the silicon was fabricated to grease auto parts, not plump up aging women’s faces.

The latest hype about the latest trendy product makes news headlines, and those in the know want to be first. However, they are also often the first to discover that the treatments don’t really work, or that the small benefit they get is not worth the hefty price tag. Here are a few that have either extremely temporary benefits, or none at all…

* Oxygen Facial. Can putting a bit of oxygen on your face really make your skin look fresh, younger and rejuvenated? Well, Hollywood actresses jumping on the oxygen facial bandwagon say yes; scientists say no. There is no real evidence that squirting atomized moisturizers, or those infused with oxygen, can have any beneficial effects whatsoever – except on the wallet of the person doing the squirting!

* Seaweed Wraps. Supposedly they can help you get rid of excess poundage by drawing out impurities from your body and helping with fluid retention. The ocean slime is wrapped around your body and your skin is detoxified as the mineral-rich seaweed draws out fluid from our cells. So you may lose some water, but will quickly put it back on. Might was well just not drink anything for a few days!

* Tua Viso Non Surgical Facelift. This facial exerciser works with a 9-volt battery to exercise the face so you don’t have to, much like an abdominizer supposedly does to your tummy. But it has little scientific evidence to back it up, and many who have tried it say it does nothing.

* Rodial Bum Lift. A topical cream that promises an “instant fix” to make your bum look smaller, including reducing 32 percent of cellulite and altering the appearance of wrinkles. But results are temporary, and you need “at least six treatments” for anything more permanent. So why is it advertised as being “instant”?

* Smooth Away hair remover. Kind of like sandpaper to buff away unwanted hair and make skin soft and smooth. Unfortunately, feels like sandpaper too – and leaves most of the hair right where it was. Also can make skin feel rough and sore.